Children's Literature

Instructor: Chi-Fen Emily Chen, Ph.D. 陳其芬

Department of English, National Kaohsiung First University of Science and Technology, Taiwan


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Introduction to Children's Literature

Before Starting Definition Values Child Development Trends

Some Trends in Children’s Literature

(This part is based on Lynch-Brown, C. & Tomlinson, C. (2005). Essentials of Children’s Literature, 5th edition. Chapter 1. Learning about children and their literature.)

  • Increased numbers of adults reading children’s books, primarily because of the Harry Potter phenomenon.

  • Increasing dominance of illustration in children’s books. Readers are becoming more visually oriented as they spend more time watching television and playing video games and spend less time reading. 

  • Fewer full-length novels and more short, high-interest, low-reading-level novels begins written for 10- to 14-year-olds.

  • Rapid growth of technology in all areas of publishing. As schools adopt computerized managements reading programs, reading and books become less a means to enjoyment and discovering new information and more a matter of gaining points.

  • An increase in the publication of bilingual books to accommodate the rapid increase in second language learner students.

  • Increased merchandising of book-related paraphernalia, such as games, craft kits, cookbooks, dolls, and doll accessories.

"When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grownup."                            

 ~ from C. S. Lewis (1952)