Children's Literature

Instructor: Chi-Fen Emily Chen, Ph.D. 陳其芬

Department of English, National Kaohsiung First University of Science and Technology, Taiwan


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Realistic Fiction
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Realistic Fiction

 

 Please read Chapter 11 from Russell, D. L. (2009). Literature for children: a short introduction.

Introduction Characteristics Types

Introduction

Realistic fiction attempts to portray the world as it is. It contains no fantasy, no supernatural elements, and it usually depicts ordinary people going about the business of daily living, with all its joys, sorrow, successes, and failures.

Over the past 150 years, children's literature has gradually moved from a romantic view of the world toward a more realistic view (*Note: "Romance" refers to the fiction portraying a world that seems happier than the one we live in). Subjects that were once taboo in realistic fiction are now commonplace, and language and character development are presented with greater candor and boldness.

In good realistic fiction,

  • the characters are engaging and believable.

  • the dialogue is believable.

  • the plot is fresh and original.

  • the setting is true to life.

  • the problems faced by the characters are honestly portrayed.

  • the resolution makes sense.

  • the theme grows naturally out of the action and characters - the writer does not preach at us.